On Judging Others

The Catholics for the Common Good way requires that faith, reason and charity be always central to social and political participation, even in the face of persecution. Sin is pervasive in the world and yes sometimes even within the Church. Attacks and persecution coming from that direction can be especially hurtful and frustrating.

If there is conflict with clergy, fall back on your faith. Remember that the Church is Holy and the gates of hell will never prevail against it.  God sent his only Son to die for our sins and to found the Church. Do not despair, it is not up to you to save the Church. Have faith in the Holy Spirit and focus on Christ in the Eucharist.

Follow the advice of St. Francis deSalles below. The response must always be prayer for our brothers and sisters in Christ who God loves unconditionally and infinitely. Turn to fellow CCG members for prayer support.

Do not be distracted by the sins of others.

The true Christian advocate must prayerfully maintain solidarity with the victims of injustice rather than focus on the sins of the perceived "victimizers." Focusing on the sins of others drains grace, obstructs love, and encumbers the awareness of one’s own sins.

(see article regarding respect for priests and bishops)
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Excerpts from Introduction to the Devout Life, Part III, Chapter 28 by St. Francis de Sales

. . .  our Crucified Saviour, while He could not wholly ignore the sin of those who Crucified Him, yet made what excuse He might for them, pleading their ignorance. And so when we cannot find any excuse for sin, let us at least claim what compassion we may for it, and impute it to the least damaging motives we can find, as ignorance or infirmity.

Judge not, and ye shall not be judged," said the Saviour of our souls; "condemn not, and ye shall not be condemned:" and the Apostle Saint Paul, "Judge nothing before the time, until the Lord come, Who both will bring to light the hidden things of darkness, and will make manifest the counsels of the hearts."

Of a truth, hasty judgments are most displeasing to God, and men's judgments are hasty, because we are not judges one of another, and by judging we usurp our Lord's own office. Man's judgment is hasty, because the chief malice of sin lies in the intention and counsel of the heart, which is shrouded in darkness to us. Moreover, man's judgments are hasty, because each one has enough to do in judging himself, without undertaking to judge his neighbour. If we would not be judged, it behoves us alike not to judge others, and to judge ourselves. Our Lord forbids the one, His Apostle enjoins the other, saying, "If we would judge ourselves, we should not be judged." But alas! for the most part we precisely reverse these precepts, judging our neighbour, which is forbidden on all sides, while rarely judging ourselves, as we are told to do.

What remedy can we apply? . . .  So far from seeking out that which is evil, Love dreads meeting with it, and when such meeting is unavoidable, she shuts her eyes at the first symptom, and then in her holy simplicity she questions whether it were not merely a fantastic shadow which crossed her path rather than sin itself. 

Again, our Crucified Saviour, while He could not wholly ignore the sin of those who Crucified Him, yet made what excuse He might for them, pleading their ignorance. And so when we cannot find any excuse for sin, let us at least claim what compassion we may for it, and impute it to the least damaging motives we can find, as ignorance or infirmity.



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